Tag Archives: recovery

Telling the story. Reading the story.


I sit in an empty room.  The floor is grey, the walls are the same grey, and the ceiling is. . . invisible. It’s not really there.  The walls sort of keep rising until they fade into a fog that absorbs them.  This is either purgatory or stasis–God knows I’m not producing anything good these days.  The stats this year prove it.

———————————————

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 430 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 7 trips to carry that many people.

There were 49 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 192 MB. That’s about 4 pictures per month.

The busiest day of the year was March 27th with 33 views. The most popular post that day was Portrait Portfolio.

———————————————

Compared to my two previous years (below), these stats indicate a flat line that seems to point right at my camera.  That’s mostly why I have decided to not purchase a new lens–what would I do with it, anyway?

This is not sadness or depression–it is a realization.  A reflection.  Knowledge.

All that now remains is acceptance.

Maybe recovery.  Can I climb out of this hole?

2014:    430 hits, 25 posts, 49 photos uploaded, 33 on busiest day.  Do I exist?
2013: 6,700 hits, 66 posts, 777 photos uploaded, 1,031 on busiest day.
2012: 2,100 hits, 72 posts, 476 photos uploaded, 149 on busiest day.

 

 

———————————————

Previous report details:

I received my annual report from WordPress early this morning. Because it seems I’m in a deep, deep slump, I wasn’t too excited about checking my numbers.  For anyone who wants to leave now because of the lack of photos, here’s the “bottom line up front”:

This year: 6,700 hits, 66 posts, 777 photos uploaded, 1,031 on busiest day.
Last year: 2,100 hits, 72 posts, 476 photos uploaded, 149 on busiest day.
My Flickr photo stream now has 26,630 visits. I wish there was a way to annualize the data on Flickr!

I’ll sit on this change for now.  What does it mean?  Have I traded quality for quantity?  Can I reproduce this “trend” next year?

From WordPress (thank you, WordPress, for the creative feedback!):

Previous year (2013):

Crunchy numbers

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 6,700 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

In 2013, there were 66 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 138 posts. There were 777 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 1 GB. That’s about 2 pictures per day.

The busiest day of the year was January 31st with 1,013 views.

Interesting. But how does that compare to last year?

Last year (2012):

Crunchy numbers

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 2,100 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 4 years to get that many views.

In 2012, there were 72 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 74 posts. There were 476 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 621 MB. That’s about a picture per day.

The busiest day of the year was December 8th with 149 views.

Buried, part 1


Buried within my archives are a few treasures.  I’m surprised that I captured, photographed, or produced an image.  But there they sit, forgotten on my hard drive or an earlier post on WordPress–and buried beneath the endless prospect of yesterday’s photographs.

I have favorite photographs.  Most of the time, they remain consistent.  But frequently I favor and then reconsider as favorites my photographs.  While most of us would recognize the sin of claiming a favorite child or a favorite wife, whenever I think of the photographs I’ve taken, a few readily come to mind as my best or my favorite.  I will, from time to time, bring them back to the surface in order to discuss them, explain them, or make them more visible for visitors.

The photo below is one of those “favorites.”  Admitting this exposes me in several ways (far beyond having a public portfolio).  Perhaps I’ve chosen poorly.  Perhaps my choice reveals something about me beyond what I intend to share.  Perhaps you will simply disagree with me.

I would include this photo in my professional portfolio.  I believe that it shows potential and vision.  It shows style.  And many aspects of the photo are accidental.  I’ve posted it in my flickr account, on deviantart, and it even is in my archive here.  Why it’s at the top:  the setting was decadent.  The weather and lighting was spectacular.  The model a very happy, positive, and attractive lady.  The fountain, an idea, and the model drove the composition.  Only afterward, did I really notice the sunglasses, the shirt, and the lighting.  And then I see the people in the background.  The man with the striped shirt.  The water (everywhere–more than I had remembered).  And the illusion (still unsure if it worked as well as I wanted).

One thing I’m sure of:  I’d take this photo again.  And again.  And again.